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Bill Gates speaks on what India does right
 
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Bill Gates gives his views on India, its future, and his foundation's work in the subcontinent during an event at the American Enterprise Institute. Subscribe AEI's YouTube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/aei For More Information http://www.aei.org Bill Gates speak on what India does right Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education #business #entrepreneur #economics #economy #india #poverty
John McEnroe on Serena Williams: A media meltdown | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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During an interview with NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro on June 25th, 2017, tennis great John McEnroe said that tennis great Serena Williams would rank about "700 in the world" if she played against men. The outcry on social media and in the press was swift, harsh, and omnipresent. But was it deserved? Christina Hoff Sommers, AEI Resident Scholar and Factual Feminist, serves up her analysis. McEnroe's comments: https://goo.gl/FxbZAN Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Reuters CBS Television Studios CBS News Productions Imagery from CBS is used for the purpose of criticism and should be considered a fair use in the United States. Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #tennis #sports
What critics of GamerGate get wrong | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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If you have been following recent news reports, you may have heard about an army of angry, thuggish male gamers marching under a banner called GamerGate. According to some reporters, this “lynch mob” will stop at nothing to defend its sexist turf. Is video game culture toxic? Watch more of the Factual Feminist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: If you have been following recent news reports, you may have heard about an army of angry, thuggish male gamers marching under a banner called GamerGate. According to some reporters, this “lynch mob” will stop at nothing to defend its sexist turf. Is video game culture toxic? I’ll consider the evidence next on the Factual Feminist. #Gamergate is a Twitter hashtag. It attracts gamers from all over the world, male and female, republican and democrat, black and white, atheists and believers. Some gamers identify with GamerGate because they believe there is too much corruption and cronyism in gaming journalism. Others are weary of cultural critics who evaluate video games through prism of social justice. A few weeks ago, I wandered into the war zone of GamerGate when I released a video about video games. I cited data that show that men are the dominant demographic in gaming. I pointed out that evidence does not support the claim that video games cause sexism and misogyny. I also deplored the treatment of women like Anita Sarkeesian and Zoe Quinn but noted that these threats should not be taken to represent gaming culture as a whole. Gamergaters were amazed and grateful for my defense of their hobby. I was deluged with affectionate messages, declarations of support, and was even given a nickname—based Mom (based means cool). But game industry journalists were not happy with my video. Writers at popular game websites like Kotaku and Polygon once valiantly defended games from the erroneous charge that they lead to violence. But now, they eagerly joined gender activists who claimed that games engender misogyny. Colin Campbell, senior reporter at Polygon called me a “reactionary” and said that my apparent indifference to sexism in videos is an “irresponsible abrogation of our shared humanity.” I don’t doubt Campbell’s sincerity. Many games do depict horrific violence and the mistreatment of women. There are scenes in Grand Theft Auto that horrify me, and I’d rather play a game based on the theme and characters of Downtown Abbey. But my game preferences cannot be generalized are certainly no basis for condemning others. Here’s where critics like Colin Campbell go wrong: they fail to connect games or things that occur in someone’s imagination to real life consequences. They need to show, not dogmatically assume, that video games make people sexist. The burden of proof rests with them. And intuitions that games, books, films, comic books, or songs are psychologically demanding and socially corrosive are rarely borne out in reality. Critics might respond that we should be unforgiving of sexist tropes even if video games can’t be proven to cause misogyny. But what counts as sexism is unsettled—even among feminists. Consider Bayonetta. Bayonetta is a powerful, charismatic lead female character created by a Japanese female game developer. She is a wildly popular video heroine, and one feminist critic even wrote that she “exudes feminism.” But leading pop critic Anita Sarkeesian disagrees. She says that “Everything about Bayonetta’s design is created specifically for the sexual pleasure of straight male gamers.” She cites a decades old feminist theory about the “male gaze” and how it objectifies and demeans women. But “gaze theory” has evolved since 1975. It turns out that spectators might be able to gaze at a woman’s beauty and also identify with her on a human level. What critics of GamerGate get wrong #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Do men need to check their privilege? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Do men need to check their privilege? Gender activists tell us that men carry around with them an invisible knapsack of advantage. Well, is this true and is it the whole story? AEI Scholar Christina Hoff Sommers checks the facts. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #men #privileged © American Enterprise Institute Transcript: If you are willing to cherry pick, stretch the truth a bit, and suppress counterevidence, you can easily make it seem like women are the have-nots in our society. You point to the wage gap, the glass ceiling. You focus on women’s vulnerability to body shaming, sexual objectification, mansplaining, street harassment, intimate partner violence. Before long you will have constructed a full-scale patriarchy. And we have hundreds of women’s groups who do just that—they specialize in persuading us that Venus is victimized and Mars is privileged. But here is the problem. Women’s advocacy groups tend to exaggerate the plight of Venus and ignore the troubles on Mars. As I have tried to show in earlier segments of this series, most of the standard feminist injustice statistics are exaggerated or just plain wrong. It not true that women are being cheated out of 23 percent of their salaries or that 1 in five will be victims of sexual assault. And it’s also the case that, in many critical domains, women are faring far better than men. Let’s consider a few: In education, it is women who are the privileged sex. At every level of education—from preschool to graduate school—and across all ethnic and class lines, women get better grades, win most of the honors and prizes, and are far more likely to go to college. Today, women earn a majority of BAs and advanced degrees. Our schools do a much better job educating women than men. Now look at the workplace. Women’s groups focus a lot of attention on people at the pinnacle of achievement—CEOs of Fortune 500 corporations, tenured physics professors at MIT, U.S. Senators—and they are right to say that there are too few women. But look what happens when you consider the entire workforce. There may be a tiny handful of women—but the lethal professions are largely a male preserve. As my favorite dissident feminist, Camille Paglia, has noted: "It is overwhelmingly men who do the dirty, dangerous work of building roads, pouring concrete, laying bricks, tarring roofs, hanging electric wires, excavating natural gas and sewage lines, cutting and clearing trees, and bulldozing ... So it’s no surprise that the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that every year about 5,000 Americans die each year in workplace accidents—92 percent of them men. We hear about the Fortune 500 CEOs, but what about the unfortunate 4,600? Alongside male salaries, perhaps some mention should be made of male sacrifice. Whenever perturbed gender warriors draw up lists of male advantages, they always mention men’s freedom from fear of being attacked. It’s true that women are much more likely to be victims of rape and sexual assault. But men are much more likely to be victims of violent crime as a whole: Consider Campus crime--men may need safe spaces more than women--according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics: Men are twice as likely to be victims of a violent crime on campus. Look at the overall Murder: Of 12,253 murder victims in 2013, 78 percent were men. Even on the Internet, men face as much or more bullying than women. According to Pew Research, More women than men are sexually harassed (7% women and 4% men), but men are the primary targets of threats (10% men compared to 6% of women). Let's continue: Here are more facts that challenge the male privilege mantra: Suicide: 77.9% were male, 22.1% female . Incarceration: 93.3% of federal inmates are male and even when men and women commit the same crime and have similar criminal histories, men receive 63 percent longer prison sentences on average. Homelessness: it’s estimated that more than 60% of homeless individuals are male. Combat: 85 percent of active duty soldiers are men. Though there are many women serving in the armed services, fewer than 8 percent profess a desire to engage in combat. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
The real reason there aren't more female scientists | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Men greatly outnumber women in the STEM subjects: Science, technology, engineering, and math. But why is that? Everywhere we hear about massive gender bias against women in these fields, but what if it's just not true? The Factual Feminist explains other reasons for the discrepancy that you may not have heard. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
The gender wage gap uses bogus statistics | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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The gender wage gap came into focus this week, but not in the way the White House wanted. A reporter asked about AEI's study showing that Obama administration female staffers make only 88% of their male counterparts' salaries. Christina Hoff Sommers examines spokesman Jay Carney's response in this premiere episode of her video blog, "Factual Feminist." Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute The gender wage gap uses bogus statistics #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
#MeToo: Movement or witch hunt? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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The #MeToo movement has the potential to correct long-tolerated abuses and to lead to a new era of understanding and respect between men and women –if it doesn't get hijacked by gender activists. AEI scholar Christina Hoff Sommers gives insight to how the movement should and shouldn't proceed if it wants to make progress. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Sources: Harper's Bazaar article https://goo.gl/MyaBdm BJS female victims of violence report https://goo.gl/tPohRf DOJ murder statistics https://goo.gl/7cXN1e The Globe and Mail article https://goo.gl/aJjFCg Matt Damon on ABC News https://goo.gl/XSy4GU Petition to remove Matt Damon from film https://goo.gl/eEYM2S Minnie Driver to the Guardian https://goo.gl/YGfX84 Matt Damon on the Today Show https://goo.gl/Z5XKqS Photo credits: BY 3.0 – David Shankbone https://goo.gl/HS6Lpj Reuters Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #metoo #feminism #feminist
The Top Five Feminist Myths of All Time | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Domestic violence statistics, girls sold as sex slaves, the wage gap-- what are the real statistics behind the plight of American women? And are the real numbers beyond critical analysis? The Factual Feminist, Christina Hoff Sommers, takes a look beyond the headlines and reveals her list of the Top 5 feminist myths. Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute MYTH 1: Women are half the world’s population, working two-thirds of the world’s working hours, receiving 10% of the world’s income, owning less than 1% of the world’s property. This faux fact is routinely quoted by advocacy groups, the World Bank, Oxfam, and the United Nations. But it is a fabrication. MYTH 2: Between 100,000 and 300,000 girls are sold into slavery each year in the United States. This sensational claim is a favorite of celebrities , journalists, advocates, and politicians—both conservative and liberal. The source for the figure is a 2001 report on child sexual exploitation by two University of Pennsylvania sociologists. But their 100,000–300,000 estimate referred to children at risk for exploitation—not actual victims. MYTH 3: In the United States, 22–35% of women who visit hospital emergency rooms do so because of domestic violence. This claim has appeared in countless fact sheets, books, and articles. The Penguin Atlas uses the emergency room figure to justify placing the U.S. on par with Uganda and Haiti for intimate violence. I have it. What is the source? It seems that several feminist scholars misunderstood a 1997 study by the Justice Department. The correct figure is not 22-35%--but—GET READY -- less than half of 1 percent. One in five in college women will be sexually assaulted. This incendiary figure is everywhere in the media today. The one-in-five figure is based on a survey called the Campus Sexual Assault Study. Two prominent criminologists have noted its fatal flaws: a very low response rate, a non-representative sample of respondents, and overly broad definitions of what counts as assault –which included such things as “attempted forced kissing” & intimate encounters while intoxicated. Defenders of the one-in-five figure will reply that the finding has been replicated by other studies. But these studies suffer from some or all of the same flaws. MYTH 5: Women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns—for doing the same work. No matter how many times this wage gap claim is decisively refuted by economists, it always comes back. The bottom line: the 23-cent gender pay gap is simply the difference between the average earnings of all men and women working full-time. It does not account for differences in occupations, positions, education, job tenure, or hours worked per week. When such relevant factors are considered, the wage gap narrows to the point of vanishing. Wage gap activists say women with identical backgrounds and jobs as men still earn less. But they always fail to take into account critical variables. These reckless claims are nearly impossible to correct because armies of advocates, journalists and political leaders depend on Killer stats to promote their cause. There is also an admirable human tendency to be protective of women—stories of female exploitation are readily believed. But killer stats undermine good causes and send scarce resources in the wrong direction. My advice to women’s advocates: Take back the truth. The Top Five Feminist Myths of All Time Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Debunking the feminist wage gap myth | IN 60 SECONDS
 
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Is there any truth to feminists' assertion that women make less money than men in the same jobs? Factual Feminist and AEI Resident Scholar Christina Hoff Sommers sheds some light on the gender wage gap controversy. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Tom Erich Ferdinand Reuters Nate Grigg COD Newsroom Music: "Sunset Boulevard" by Doxent Zsigmond http://ccmixter.org/files/doxent/50485 Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #feminism #feminist #economics #economy #mythbusters #debunked #politics #news
Sexual assault myths: Part 1 | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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We don’t live in a rape culture, but we do inhabit a culture saturated with gender propaganda. Call it a Ms.Information culture. And nowhere is Ms.Information more rampant than in the area of sexual assault. On this week's episode of the Factual Feminist: The two biggest myths about women and sexual violence. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: We don’t live in a rape culture, but we do inhabit a culture saturated with gender propaganda. Call it a Ms.Information culture. And nowhere is Ms.Information more rampant than in the area of sexual assault. Coming up on the next Factual Feminist: The two biggest myths about women and sexual violence. Myth one: 1 in 5 college women are raped. This claim has been repeated over and over by journalists, activists and political leaders so often it has become the conventional wisdom.  As I and many others have said, the figure is wrong, and now there is new data, released just last month, from the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics which gives us a much more reliable estimate. The 1-in-5 claim is based on a 2007 internet survey with vaguely worded questions, a low response rate, and a non-representative sample. Other studies with similar findings have used the same faulty methods. But the real number, according to the BJS, is 1 in 53; too many, but a long way from one in five. Does that mean that sexual assault is not a problem on campus? Of course not. Too many college women are victimized, and too often they suffer in silence. But it is not an epidemic and it is not a culture. Exaggeration and hysteria shed no light and produce no solutions, and actually diminish the real problem Myth two: Women almost never lie about rape—no more than 2 percent of rape charges turn out to be false. Rape crisis activists often urge us to dogmatically “believe women.”  They are reacting to a long history where victims were routinely disbelieved or blamed because of their choice of clothing or sexual history. But the answer to bad old practices is not bad new practices. As Cathy Young has noted in an excellent discussion in Slate: “The myth of the lying woman,” has been replaced by “the myth of the woman who never lies.”  Why replace one myth with another. Of course women lie. Not because they are women—but because they are human. And human beings lie. Especially about sex. A woman making a false accusation might feel she has a reason to do so–maybe she wants to explain away an embarrassing sexual encounter, or maybe she is disturbed and seeking attention, sympathy, or revenge. Perhaps, even, she may have recently taken one too many feminist theory seminars and came to believe that drunken or regretted sex constitutes felony rape. The claim that only 2 percent of rape accusations are false is unfounded. It seems to have started with Susan Brownmiller’s 1975 feminist manifesto “Against Our Will.” Other statistics for false accusations range from 8 to 43 percent. But these studies have flaws too. The truth is, we have no idea right now what the figure truly is. And it may be unknowable. For one thing, it is hard to define what we mean by a false accusation. Is it a case where the police refuse to pursue a claim because of too little evidence? That does not prove it’s false. On the other hand, it would be wrong to assume that just because someone is found guilty and sent to jail, that means the charge was legitimate.  We know that many men have been found guilty of rape, only later to be exonerated. Think of the high school football star Brian Banks who served 5 years in jail before his accuser admitted that she fabricated the accusation. And recently, we have seen dozens of high-profile campus rape cases revealed to be born of false accusations. The bottom line: false accusations are nearly impossible to define, let alone quantify.  We can’t know for sure how common they are. But we do know that they happen far too often. So there is no alternative: we need to treat the alleged victim seriously and respectfully, while at the same time being vigilant about protecting the rights of the accused. That’s called due process. #aei #news #politics
What the catcalling video gets wrong | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Have you seen the YouTube video that shows an attractive young woman being harassed by men in the streets of New York City? It’s attracted more than 33 million views so far. Some say stopping the verbal assault of women in the street is the new frontier for human rights—and they see this video as a critical tool in raising awareness. Could they be right? Watch more of the Factual Feminist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to the AEI YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: Have you seen the YouTube video that shows an attractive young woman being harassed by men in the streets of New York City? Well, it’s had attracted than 33 million view so far. Some say stopping the verbal assault of women in the street is the new frontier for human rights—and they see this video as a critical tool in raising awareness. Could they be right? That’s coming up next on the Factual Feminist. Now, street harassment can be very annoying and it’s possible this video will do some good as a reminder to men that women often don’t appreciate it. But the feminist anti-harassment group that put out this video –Hollaback—it does not merely want to improve public manners. It wants to raise consciousness about what life is like for women under patriarchy. According to this group, street harassment is “a power dynamic” that silences women’s voices and reminds them of their subordinate status. Its website calls street harassment “the most pervasive form of gender-based violence.” Let's check some facts: The viral video ad was created by an agency that specializes in creating viral video ads. It’s a riveting bit of advertising, but it forces the complicated issue of street interactions into the simplistic, Oppression 101 victimology morality tale. It is propaganda, not evidence of a crime against womankind. The video gives the impression that the woman is relentlessly targeted. But we only see highlights from a ten hour shoot. We have no idea what happened during the other 9 hours and 58 minutes. Viewers are lead to believe the harassment took place everywhere in the city. But some writers at the website Mass Appeal took a careful look and were able to determine that most of the footage—80 percent—is from one street in Harlem and Times Square. If the ad makers would manipulate our perceptions about the where the harassment took place, what else might they manipulate? Hey, I am not blaming them. It’s an ad. But here is a second and more serious problem. The video overrides critical distinctions. Unsolicited attention from strangers ranges from friendly comments, to rude and annoying jeers—to stalking. Why conflate these? Street interactions are complex, and context matters, is it night? or is it day? what’s the neighborhood? Some women might feel flattered or delighted by comments like “good morning, beautiful,” while others would be put off. Amanda Hess argued that comments from a male strangers like “How are you this morning? “are “just another unearned claim for a woman’s attention.” Well, anyone who has ever walked a city street knows that there are many annoying, unearned claims to your attention. If we deserve to be protected from comments, then what about panhandlers, evangelists with pamphlets, and Greenpeace volunteers with clipboards? I love the environment, but I don’t like being shamed for not stopping when they ask “Do you have a moment for the environment?” Personally, I’d probably prefer that a man whistled at me, than have to respond to that. Urban streets are free spaces—not gated communities with a rigid set of bylaws. And the First Amendment applies as well. According to Hollaback’s mission statement, the group is hoping to find a way to inspire legislators and the police to take action. They’re vague about what precise actions they have in mind. But Northwestern Professor Laura Beth Nielsen is not vague at all. She wants a law prohibiting, “uninvited harassing speech or actions targeted towards individuals in public spaces on the basis of sex,” because it would “weigh in on the side of equality.” Equality? Is she serious? Harassment can happen anywhere, but it is more common in economically deprived neighborhoods. #aei #feminism
Campus sexual assault: Bad statistics don't help victims | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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For years, we have heard that that 1-in-4 or 1-in-5 college women are victims of rape or sexual assault. The studies behind the statistic tended to be agenda-driven and unscientific, but now according to hundreds of news stories, there’s a new, more comprehensive survey that confirms epidemic levels of sexual predation on campus. Could these researchers be right? Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #rape #campus © American Enterprise Institute Transcript: For years, we have heard that that 1-in-4 or 1-in-5 college women are victims of rape or sexual assault. But the studies behind the statistic tended to be agenda driven and unscientific. But now, according to hundreds of news stories, there’s a new, more comprehensive survey that confirms epidemic levels of sexual predation on campus. Could these researchers be right? That’s coming up next on the Factual Feminist. Last month, the Association of American Universities released the findings of its massive new report on campus sexual assault. The authors surveyed students at 27 colleges across the US and found that 23 percent of female college seniors—nearly one in four—reported that they had experienced unwanted sexual contact since entering college. First, the survey was offered to 780,000 students, but only 150,000 students filled it out. That’s a response rate of only 19%. The authors caution in the study that estimates may be too high because of “non-response bias”—that is, because students who have been sexually assaulted may be more likely to fill out a survey about sexual assault than those who have not. The authors also warn that their findings are “not representative” and should not be extrapolated to anything outside their frame. Like past surveys on campus sexual assault, respondents were not asked whether or not they had ever been raped or sexually assaulted. Such direct questions are known to yield low numbers of victimization. Instead, the authors asked if students experienced a range of behaviors from forced penetration to kissing to unwanted touching or grabbing. If someone rubbed up against you in a sexual way at a party—that could count. Using such definitions, the authors calculated the rate of college females experiencing unwanted sexual contact at each of the schools surveyed. The authors warn that it would be “over simplistic” or “misleading” to conclude that 20-25% of students are victims of sexual assault nationwide according to their findings. Well, that didn’t stop the media . “Unwanted sexual contact” became “sexual assault”—and the journalists were off to the races. It’s far from perfect, but the best data we have on sexual assault comes from the Justice Department, Bureau of Justice Statistics. It find that approximately 1 in 53 women will be victims of rape or sexual assault while in college. That is still too many victims—but it’s vastly different from 1 in 4. And according to the latest data from the FBI, the US rape rate has been in a sharp decline for decades. And even though politicians, journalists, and celebrities are fixated on the supposed campus rape epidemic, females are who are not enrolled in college are actually more likely to be victims of sexual violence than college women. The Factual Feminist verdict? As its own authors admit, the new campus rape survey is flawed, it asked vaguely worded questions to a non representative sample of students who chose to participate. This is unfortunate, because even though activists tend to use unreliable statistics, sexual assault on campus is a serious problem. There are victims on campus who need protection. We badly need better policies and practices. Misleading research undermines that effort. Do you think self-selecting surveys are a reliable way to measure an issue like sexual assault on campus? Let me know in the comments. And if you found this video useful, please show your support by subscribing to the series. Likes on Facebook are much appreciated. And please, follow me on Twitter. And thank you for watching the Factual Feminist. Campus sexual assault: Bad statistics don't help victims #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Intersectional Feminism: What is it? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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If you have wondered why there are so many millennials on campus telling people to check their privilege, demanding trigger warnings, calling people out for micro aggressions, and retreating to safe spaces, the Factual Feminist has the answer: Intersectional feminism. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel http://bit.ly/1RpRv9y Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #millennials #safespace #campus © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript Intersectional feminism. It’s all the rage on campus and on social media, but what is it? And is its new popularity a welcome development? Coming up next on the Factual Feminist. Suddenly intersectionality is on the boards. News stories are turning up everywhere. Intersectional theory was first developed in the 1970s and 1980s by a group of African American feminist scholars and activists. They accused the women’s movement of neglecting black women and of misunderstanding oppression. Pathologies like and racism and sexism, they said, are not separate systems—they connect and overlap—and create a complex arrangement of advantages and burdens. White women, for example, are penalized for their gender—but privileged by their race. Black men, suffer from their race, but garner advantage from their gender. Black women—are in double-jeopardy—they are disadvantaged by both race and gender. Patricia Hill Collins, professor at the University of Maryland and former president of the American Sociological Association, is one of the chief architects of intersectionality theory. The textbook she co-authored describes the United States as a “matrix of oppression.” Beneath a veneer of freedom and opportunity, there lies a rigid system of privilege and domination. Now most Americans don’t see it, but Collins and her co-author alert students to the fact that the true nature of their society has been hidden from them. “Dominant forms of knowledge have been constructed largely from the experiences of the most powerful.” The text promises to introduce students to deeper “subordinated truths” by avoiding what it calls “Western” and “masculine” styles of thinking which could obscure these truths. According to the theory, those who are most oppressed have access to deeper, more authentic knowledge about life and society. In short: members of privileged groups (especially white males) should not only check their privilege, but listen to those they have oppressed—because those groups possess a superior understanding of the world. Initially, the primary focus of intersectional feminism was on black women. But the number of victims quickly multiplied. This graphic from a popular Women’s Studies textbook includes 14 or 15 marginalized identities. The Factual Feminist is concerned. Now there are social scientists who use a sensible, non-politicized version of intersectionality to understand complex social identities—I have no quarrel with them. But what concerns me is how intersectional feminism is taught and practiced on the college campus. I have many objections—I will limit myself to three.   Problem 1: It’s a Conspiracy theory: If intersectionality theory were merely a reminder to be sensitive to different kinds of social advantages and disadvantages, that would be fine. But it is much more than that. It is an all-encompassing theory of human reality-- constructed to be immune to criticism. If you question it, that only proves you don’t understand it—or are just part of the problem it seeks to correct. That is why articles by skeptics almost never appear in textbooks like these. And certain groups—men, for example—are sinners who are marked with a capital P. If they dare to question the theory they will be told to check their privilege. Their job is to atone for their unearned advantages and learn from those they have oppressed. Some men are really taking this to heart. Consider this tweet: @arthur_affect--As a dude who cares about feminism sometimes I want to join all men arm-in-arm & then run off a cliff and drag the whole gender into the sea Intersectional Feminism: What is it? Photo credits: Reuters Festival Latinidades #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #politics
Microaggressions: Fact vs. Myth | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Columbia University's Derald Wing Sue defines microaggressions as "brief, everyday exchanges that send denigrating messages to certain individuals because of their group membership". Yet research from Scott Lillienfeld says that the evidence for microaggressions is flimsy at best. Who's right? Factual Feminist Christina Hoff Sommers explains. Scott Lillienfeld's critique: https://goo.gl/BKWyyy Derald Wing Sue's response: https://goo.gl/8XASjH Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Universal Studios Columbia University Twenty20 MicroReport In the event that materials used in this video have not been licensed from their respective rights holders, the materials have been used for commentary or criticism, and qualify as fair uses in the United States. Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #factfem #factualfeminist #basedmom #feminism #feminist #whiteprivilege #intersectionality #privilege #racism #science
Hillary Clinton on sexual assault issues: Crusader or hypocrite? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Many say it's unfair for anyone to bring President Bill Clinton’s sex scandals into his wife’s presidential campaign. Are they right? The Factual Feminist explores the evidence. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Photo Credits Bob Mical Ildar Sagdejev Phil Roeder Reuters Refinery29 Vladimir Pustovit Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #hillary #hillaryclinton #hillary2016 #clinton © American Enterprise Institute Transcript Many say it's unfair and unseemly for anyone to bring President Bill Clinton’s sex scandals into his wife’s presidential campaign. Are they right? Let’s review the facts. That’s coming up next on the Factual Feminist. During Mr. Clinton’s presidency, three women came forward accusing him of sexual assault. Senior White House officials—certainly with the approval of the President and First Lady—worked aggressively to undermine the character and credibility of the accusers. The three charges of assault were never resolved. The Clinton scandals are back in the news partly because Donald Trump called Mr. Clinton “one of the great woman abusers of all time” and Mrs. Clinton her husband’s “enabler.” But there is another reason we are discussing Mr. Clinton’s past: One of the President’s accusers, Juanita Broaddrick, sent out this tweet on January 6 : “I was 35 years old when Bill Clinton, Ark. Attorney General raped me and Hillary tried to silence me. I am now 73 ... it never goes away.” Articles have now appeared in two left-of-center websites—Vox and Slate— noting that it is hard to dismiss Ms. Broaddrick given the new progressive consensus on believing victims. The injunction to believe victims gained currency among progressives because of a potent mix of gender theory and advocacy statistics. The theory came from legal scholar Catherine MacKinnon who taught that “feminism is built on believing women’s accounts of sexual use and abuse by men.” The statistics were supplied by activist researchers who claimed that women almost never lie about sexual assault. Those activist statistics have been shredded —but among progressives the doctrine of sexual victim infallibility lived on. But if victims are infallible, then those they accuse must be presumed guilty. Which brings us back to the Clinton scandals. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Gender activists dismayed by this new reason for the wage gap | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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It is just not true that, for the same work, women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. Factors such as college major, occupation and length of time in the workplace explain most of the pay gap. AEI's Sally Satel explains the discovery of another factor contributing to that gap. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial Transcript: Hi, I’m Sally Satel, visiting Factual Feminist and resident scholar at AEI. Economists have shown over and over again that when you control for relevant differences between men and women employees the wage gap narrows to a very small amount. New research shows that another variable shrinks that discrepancy even more. The additional variable is “overwork.” An overworker is someone who regularly works more than 50 hours per week at his or her job. This has nothing to do with putting in over time or working more than one job. Overwork is typical of people in medical and legal careers and in finance and in managerial positions. Two researchers, Youngjoo Chu at the University of Indiana and Kim Weeden at Cornell have paid careful attention to it. The two were puzzled that the gap between male and female earnings has persisted even as more women were entering the workplace, graduating from college, and delaying child bearing. This is where overwork comes in. For one thing, the pay is better for a 50 plus hour work week. The corporate world places a huge premium on long hours—and so doubling one’s workweek far more than doubles his or her salary. No surprise that bosses might perceive overworkers as more committed and loyal than full-time workers and disproportionately reward them with better work assignments or promotions. All this adds to their paychecks. Second, and key, overwork is more common among men by a ratio of 2 to 1. The ratio has been stable for at least two decades. Women are less likely than men to enter jobs that require extremely long hours and less likely to stay in such jobs. (I’ll note here that the authors found no evidence that men who overwork were paid more than women who do.) Wage gap activists are aware that women work fewer hours over all and that this explains part of the gap. Their solution? Change the workplace. Why not make the workplace work better for everyone—they say-- by discouraging over-time and workaholism. Here is the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford. It says “We need to redesign workplaces so that they are better aligned with the lives of the people who work in them.” Ok, accommodations within reason make good sense. Until they say: “Performance should no longer be measured by how many hours employees put in.” The logic seems to be: if men and women but especially men were less hard driving, then men and women’s pay would equalize—and we would all be happier and have a better work/life balance. This has a surface plausibility—but think about it: Anytime you restrict the freedom of one group to equalize outcomes, the cure ends up being worse than the perceived disease. Just remember title IX which led to the cutting of male sports teams while female teams went underpopulated! Practical question: How would truncated work weeks actually operate in the neutered workplace? In journalism, reporters cover stories and beats for more than a few hours or days at a time. Law firm and financial clients want to see the same faces handling their cases or transactions and, in medicine, want the same doctor who knows their medical history. You just can’t hand off your clients and patients as if they were widgets. And when you do, mistakes happen. Are men who overwork and women who don’t just following a socially sanctioned script? This may play some role, but here’s a question: is overwork really a problem? I grant you that being forced to work at a job you don't like is hell--the fewer hours the better. But for a creative or entrepreneurial person, or someone on a mission -work is exhilarating. Gender activists dismayed by this new reason for the wage gap #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
How to survive the wacky gender politics on campus | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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If you’re headed to college for the first time this fall, you need to be aware of some strange new developments. Don’t be alarmed, most of you are going to be very happy at college, and will thrive there. But you need to know what to expect. Christina Hoff Sommers explains how to negotiate your way through the wacky sexual politics on campus. Subscribe AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thefactualfe... Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/chsommers For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #college #university #campus © American Enterprise Institute Partial Transcript: Colleges throughout the United States are carried away with eccentric gender politics. In general, the higher the tuition, the greater the eccentricity. At schools with a more working class population, the students often have more pressing concerns than finding new ways to be offended. As an incoming freshman, many of you will be subject to special training sessions and introduced to a new vocabulary with odd terms like “trigger warnings,” “othering,” “microaggression,” “male privilege,” and “safe spaces.” Outside Speakers—especially comedians— will be called out and boycotted for breaches of sensitivity. Colleges are changing their mission: Truth seeking is being replaced by the more sensitive goal of making everyone—especially female students-- feel safe and validated. Ideas that get in the way of this mission may not tolerated. Here are three survival tips—custom-tailored to your political views—plus a fourth, bonus tip for everybody. Number one: If you are libertarian or conservative, no one is that concerned with your feelings. That’s actually a good thing. You’re going to face a challenging intellectual environment. According to a recent UCLA study, there are nearly 5 times more liberal professors than conservative professors on college campuses. Your views will be tested every day, but most of your teachers will treat you respectfully. Your ideas will face critical scrutiny and you may end up revising or abandoning some of them. Again, that’s a good thing. That’s what education is supposed to be about—and it’s something many liberal students are missing. What is not good is that a noisy minority of students—and a few professors—will see you as the embodiment of evil. If you express your opinions vigorously, some classmates may complain to school authorities that your presence makes them feel “unsafe.” But here is the bright side. Even at schools overrun by the new orthodoxy, you will find great friends and allies, male and female, and professors too, whether they agree with you or not. Now, if you are liberal and idealistic, and also a woman, you face a different sort of risk. When you get to campus you will find a large and excited group of gender activists—students and some professors—eager to recruit you to their cause. They will present you with shocking statistics of sexual violence on campus, and theories about an oppressive patriarchy. They will tell you how mistreated and traumatized you are. It will seem new and exciting—a way to make friends and fight injustice at the same time—and you may be tempted to sign up. Just be aware that most of the victim statistics you will hear are wildly exaggerated and the theories about women’s oppression are twisted and surreal. As for trigger warnings and safe spaces—these are infantile. They are the opposite of empowerment. It’s the fashion on many campuses to treat women as delicate flowers—fragile little birds. But most of you are tough and resilient. The gender activists I am describing will probably say, “Don’t listen to her.” “Don’t take her word for anything.” Well, that’s true you shouldn’t take my word on these matters. You shouldn’t take anybody’s word. Think for yourself. Your feminist foremothers fought and won a battle for your right to be educated on a par with men. They knew you were tough, and wanted you to have the opportunity to put that strength to use. Don’t waste it by falling captive to a pointless ideology or indulging in victimhood. Take serious classes in philosophy, science, and history. Avoid courses that luxuriate in female oppression. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Criminal sentencing: Do women get off easy? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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If you are a criminal defendant, it is far better to be a woman than a man. For the same crime, and with a similar criminal history, men in the U.S. are imprisoned much more frequently and for much longer sentences. This is one gender gap that we hear very little about. AEI resident scholar Christina Hoff Sommers explains the very real consequences of being a man vs. a woman on trial for the same crime. Watch more of the Factual Feminist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMw39... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #politics #news #feminism #feminist #law #lawyer #crime © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: If you are a criminal defendant, it is far better to be a woman than a man. For the same crime, and with a similar criminal history, men in the U.S. are imprisoned much more frequently and for much longer sentences. This is one gender gap that we hear very little about. Coming up next on the Factual Feminist. We incarcerate people in the U.S. on a scale unheard of in most parts of the world. If you brought together all those now in prison and on probation or parole, it would constitute the second largest city in the nation. And it would be close to 90 percent male. Now the fact that more men than women go to jail is not itself a sign of discrimination. Men are far more likely to be rule breakers, risk-takers, and perpetrators of crime. But what happens when men and women are arrested for the same crime? To answer this question, Professor Sonja Starr of the University of Michigan Law School examined a huge dataset of federal criminal cases. Unlike other studies that looked only at the sentencing stage, she followed the fate of defendants from arrest through sentencing. Her findings were shocking. After controlling for the arrest offense, criminal history, and other prior characteristics—and looking at the process from beginning to end—she found that women are significantly more likely than men to avoid charges and convictions altogether and “twice as likely to avoid incarceration if convicted.” On average, men received 63% longer sentences than women arrested for the same crime. Professor Starr estimates that the gender gap in sentencing is about six times as large as the sentencing gap between black and white defendants. Starr offers a few possible explanations for the gender disparity: Women are often viewed as “followers” of their male romantic partners,” so judges and prosecutors might perceive them to be less responsible. Second, women are more likely to be the primary caretakers of their children, and prosecutors or judges might worry about the effect of jailing mothers. It’s also possible prosecutors and judges are more easily persuaded that women who commit crimes have mental health problems. What is the solution? Harsher sentences for women is not the way to go. The U.S. is already known as Incarceration Nation—more prisoners is not the answer. But if the courts are indeed making exceptions for women for their special circumstances, they should consider doing the same for men. As Starr points out: “About one in every fifty American men is currently behind bars, and we could think about gender disparity as perhaps being a key dimension of that problem." So here we have a pressing gender equity issue—with huge social consequences. But If you look at the major women’s websites, you find mainly complaints about how women are treated in the criminal justice system. On the ACLU website you learn that, “Women receive harsher sentences for killing their male partners than men receive for killing their female partners.” The source is a 1980s fact sheet from a women’s advocacy group. But a newer and more serious study from the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that even if you exclude all the cases where women killed a husband out of fear or self-defense, Wives received shorter prison sentences than husbands (a 10-year difference, on average.) Criminal sentencing: Do women get off easy? #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia on #Gamergate | VIEWPOINT
 
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Based Mom and Based Goddess explore the #Gamergate controversy and how the radical feminist establishment was not prepared for the strong defense put forth by gamers. This is part four of a nine part series featuring Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia. The other videos in the series can be found here: Part 1 – The state of contemporary feminism: https://goo.gl/nRJ0ss Part 2 – The fight for student liberties: https://goo.gl/dS1QKF Part 3 – Intersectional feminism and safe spaces: https://goo.gl/cmbj8g Part 4 – Based Mom and Based Goddess on #Gamergate: https://goo.gl/ZFfuzh Part 5 – Trigger warnings and the danger of overprotecting students: https://goo.gl/WE29Yc Part 6 – The “male gaze”: https://goo.gl/hRWfhi Part 7 – Fixing a broken university curriculum: https://goo.gl/pWmpwh Part 8 – The absence of biology in gender studies: https://goo.gl/QrZQEU Part 9 – The danger of looking at history through a contemporary political lens: https://goo.gl/D82LYB Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #politics #news #games #gaming #gamer #videogames #gamergirl #interview
The Title IX activist campaign against men's sports | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Title IX outlawed gender discrimination in publicly funded educational programs, including athletics. But something went wrong in the law's implementation, and Title IX turned into a quota system, forcing equal numbers of male and female athletes. Over time, this has forced the culling of men's sports programs to maintain equal numbers. As the number of athletic programs for men dwindles, the Factual Feminist asks: can college sports survive Title IX? Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute The Title IX activist campaign against men's sports Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
The war on boys: Have they been left behind? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Many are content to dismiss the underachievement of boys in school as, "just the way things are." But the consequences of educational underachievement have never been more serious. The Factual Feminist explains why if we don't help boys close the education gap now, they may never catch up. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute The war on boys: have they been left behind? Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Google Memo: Beyond the culture war | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Christina Hoff Sommers, the Factual Feminist, offers her take on James Damore's now infamous memo, "Google's Ideological Echo Chamber". DOCUMENT: Google's Ideological Echo Chamber https://goo.gl/A57TKs ARTICLE: Google CEO's statement on the firing of James Damore https://goo.gl/4uWT7v ARTICLE: Does biology explain why men outnumber women in tech? https://goo.gl/xfCajJ ARTICLE: What It’s Like to Be a Woman at a Tech Conference https://goo.gl/d5Kiib Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: James Damore Alice Eagly BY - fdecomite https://goo.gl/YHy3ey Twenty20 Chloe Condon Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #google #googlememo #technology #biology #feminism #feminist #science
Rape culture panic is not the answer | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Sexual assault on campus is a serious problem—but, "rape culture" is not the answer. The Factual Feminist compares this panic to another nationwide hysteria based on faulty statistics, and how we can avoid making the same mistakes. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Rape culture panic is not the answer #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
World Cup pay gap: Here's why it's justified | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Critics are up in arms about the World Cup gender gap. The prize money for women is far less than for men. Commentators attribute the gap to sexism and structural inequities. Could they be right? Let’s review the evidence. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like Factual Feminist on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thefactualfe... Follow Factual Feminist on Twitter https://twitter.com/chsommers For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #politics #news #government #education #feminism #feminist #soccer #worldcup #worldcup2014 #sport #sports © American Enterprise Institute Partial Transcript: This summer, the U.S. women’s soccer team electrified the nation when it defeated Germany 2–0 and then Japan 5–2 to win the World Cup. Instead of celebrating the team’s brilliant play and the continuing growth of women’s soccer, many in the media are fixating on what they see as a shameful “World Cup pay gap.” The U.S. women’s team collected only $2 million in prize money for its victory over Japan. But for the corresponding men’s competition in 2014, the winning German team won $35 million—while the Americans, who lost in the first round, took home $8 million. Spurred by the media reports, Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont introduced a resolution on the floor of the U.S. Senate urging FIFA, the organization that sponsors the World Cup, to “immediately eliminate gender pay inequity”: Here is where I think the Senator and the media critics go wrong. The prize disparity has much more to do with sports economics than sexism. The World Cup is a world competition—hence its title—and its prizes are based on paid viewership, in stadiums but mainly on television, the world over. The women’s players are formidable athletes and the Women’s World Cup is growing rapidly in popularity, especially in the U.S., but it’s still nowhere near the men’s cup in terms of world popularity. According to FIFA, the 2011 Women’s World Cup was watched by nearly 408 million people around the world; for the men’s World Cup in, 2010 the figure was 3.2 billion. In 2010, the men’s World Cup generated nearly $3.7 billion in revenue, while the women’s World Cup generated about $73 million. FIFA is a shady organization, and sexism can probably be counted among its many vices—but the differences in its men’s and women’s prizes are actually less than the differences in its revenues from the two competitions. Well, the sports equity activists have heard all of this before, and they have a reply. “Why accept market forces?” they ask. After all, these forces were shaped by a culture that has been traditionally hostile to women. Shane Ferro, a feminist business reporter at Business Insider explains it this way: “Most of us have been socialized to accept men’s sports as dominant, and somehow automatically more interesting.” And once society internalizes a falsehood, she says, “it’s not so easy to correct it.” Hard, but not impossible. There is now a call by sports equity activists to change the market by re-socializing fans. “Sports fans, for the most part, will watch whatever you put in front of them,” says Kavitha Davidson at Bloomberg News. Highlight the women’s teams, and fan interest and excitement will come. A recently published study by two feminist sociologists [SHOW] comes to the same conclusion. The authors lament that women’s sports receive only about 3% of network TV attention, down from 5% in 1989. Major sports media, they say, is a “place set up by men for men to celebrate men’s sensational athletic accomplishments” while giving short shrift to women’s achievements. They acknowledge that there are fewer female teams, so they suggest for now the media increase coverage of women’s sports to 12–18%. They also specify that the sportscasters should report on women’s sports with the same “enthusiasm” as men’s sports. More coverage plus more enthusiasm will increase the fan base, and that will drive up women’s salaries and prizes. Well, it’s the gender sociologists and the feminist journalists—not the sports fans— who have internalized a falsehood. There are athletic competitions where women attract more fans than men—figure skating and gymnastics, for example. And women’s tennis, while not as popular as men’s, certainly has a large and devoted audience. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Harvey Weinstein: Sexual assault in 2017 | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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In light of the allegations against powerful men like Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer, how should businesses and society respond? AEI's Christina Hoff Sommers – The Factual Feminist – offers her take. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Twenty20 BY – James McNellis https://goo.gl/NVZkVQ Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #harveyweinstein #sexualabuse #metoo #sexism
Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia on the absence of biology in gender studies | VIEWPOINT
 
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Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia address what they see as the biggest gap in women’s studies—the failure to have any requirement for biology. They go on to talk about the effects of the “social constructionist view of gender” that entirely dismisses the importance of hormones and endocrinology in the behavior of the sexes. This is part eight of a nine part series featuring Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia. The other videos in the series can be found here: Part 1 – The state of contemporary feminism: https://goo.gl/nRJ0ss Part 2 – The fight for student liberties: https://goo.gl/dS1QKF Part 3 – Intersectional feminism and safe spaces: https://goo.gl/cmbj8g Part 4 – Based Mom and Based Goddess on #Gamergate: https://goo.gl/ZFfuzh Part 5 – Trigger warnings and the danger of overprotecting students: https://goo.gl/WE29Yc Part 6 – The “male gaze”: https://goo.gl/hRWfhi Part 7 – Fixing a broken university curriculum: https://goo.gl/pWmpwh Part 8 – The absence of biology in gender studies: https://goo.gl/QrZQEU Part 9 – The danger of looking at history through a contemporary political lens: https://goo.gl/D82LYB Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #politics #news #genderequality #gendernorms #biology #interview
Are gender roles a marker of true equality? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Men and women, taken as groups, are different in important respects. The differences appear to be based on some combination of biological and cultural forces. But is gender role differentiation a sign of well-being and freedom? Christina Hoff Sommers explains how prosperity and equality may bring greater opportunities for self-actualization. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: In January 2015, I spoke at Yale University. I was the guest of the Buckley program. I had a wonderful time and was dazzled by a group of students who joined me for dinner. But a few days later the Yale Women’s Center issued an “official statement” about my lecture. What did it say? That’s coming up next on the Factual Feminist. The morning after my talk, the Women’s Center held a special event to evaluate my presentation. I would have been happy to attend but was not invited. In their “official statement” they say, “As an organization we took issue with several of Dr. Sommers’ key tenets. Sommers describes gender roles as biologically innate, rather than also constructed through culture and socialization.” They deemed my position “potentially dangerous” and even “xenophobic.” Dangerous? Xenophobic—Moi? As if. So here is the Factual Feminist’s “official reply.” Men and women, taken as groups, are different in important respects. And the differences appear to be based on some yet to be understood combination of biological and cultural forces. I know of no one who denies the role of culture—but many campus feminists seem to want to rule biology out of order. I said in my lecture that we have to be vigilant about expanding gender roles and allowing people to defect from the conventions of masculinity or femininity—on the other hand, I said we should also be tolerant of those who embody them. A few years ago I came across an academic study in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology about differences between men and women that I think the Yale Women’s Center should take seriously. The researchers looked at gender and personality norms across 55 nations. Throughout the world, women tend to be more nurturing, risk averse, and emotionally expressive, while men are tend to be more competitive, risk taking, and emotionally flat—(oh dear, that sounds pejorative—I prefer to say stoical.) But the most fascinating finding is this: They found that personality differences between men and women are the largest and most robust in the more prosperous, advanced industrial societies—like the US, Canada, and France. According to the authors, nations with high social development—long life expectancy, high levels of literacy, education, and income—are likely to have the largest sex differences in personality. Why should that be? The authors hypothesize that prosperity and equality bring greater opportunities for self-actualization—men and women are empowered to be who they most truly are. For example, it is conspicuously the case that gay liberation is a feature of advanced, prosperous societies: such societies afford almost everyone on the gender spectrum more opportunities to embrace their gender identities. This cross-cultural research is far from conclusive, but it is intriguing. Just think: What if gender differentiation can be a sign not of oppression but of well-being—of freedom and genuine equality? Let me give an example. I recently saw an article on the Wharton School website that laments the dearth of women engineers and holds up China and Russia as superior examples of equity. More women in those countries are engineers than in the US, and the author blames this on workplace biases and stereotypes. But perhaps American women earn fewer degrees in engineering because, compared to their Russian and Chinese counterparts, they have more opportunities to pursue careers that interest them more. It appears that in the pursuit of happiness, men and women take somewhat different paths. The Yale Women’s center critics seem to think this view is reactionary and harmful to women. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
How fainting couch feminism threatens freedom | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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AEI resident scholar and former professor Christina Hoff Sommers has been lecturing on college campuses for more than twenty years. Recently, some students have conducted protests against speech they find objectionable. They've forced lecturers to cancel talks, have security protect the speakers, or even have universities launch investigations into the student complaints against their professors. Dr. Sommers takes a look at this recent wave of protests, and posits that the First Amendment is being replaced by a woman's right not to be made uncomfortable. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thefactualfe... Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/chsommers For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #politics #news #feminism #feminist #university #college #censorship #freespeech #campus © American Enterprise Institute Partial Transcript: Consider what happened to feminist professor Laura Kipnis at Northwestern University. She wrote an essay making light of trigger warnings and safe spacers. Two graduate students found her views “terrifying” and filed Title IX harassment charges against her. Her university, apparently intimidated by the grad students, took their charges seriously. It carried out a formal investigation of the professor and her “offending” essay. Title IX was once a common sense law about gender fairness in education. Today it’s being weaponized for use by fainting couch feminists who see the world as a battle between fragile maidens and evil predators. Vox recently published an article by a professor entitled “I’m a liberal professor, and my liberal students terrify me.” They terrify him because as he explains, “Hurting a student's feelings, even in the course of instruction that is absolutely appropriate and respectful, can now get a teacher into serious trouble.” I recently encountered fainting couchers at Oberlin College and Georgetown University. I visited both campuses to give talks on the need to reform feminism and correct exaggerated victim statistics. In the past, activist students who disagreed with me came to my lectures to spar and debate. Today, they issue trigger warnings and accuse me of giving them PTSD. At both Oberlin and Georgetown, activists organized safe spaces were where students could flee if they were panicked by my arguments. While I spoke at Oberlin, 35 students and a therapy dog sought refuge in a safe room. (I feel badly that I triggered a dog .) Paranoid flyers festooned the walls. The first three rows of the lecture hall were filled with students who had taped their mouths shut with red duct tape. At Georgetown, the editorial board of the school newspaper, The Hoya, denounced my lecture as “harmful” and “not the conversation that students should be having.” “Students,” said the board, “should engage in a dialogue that focuses on establishing a safe space for survivors.” Oh really? Since when are members of that board the arbiters of what can be thought and said? Imagine being an untenured professor at Georgetown. By the way, officials at both Oberlin and Georgetown were so alarmed by the frantic Facebook postings before my arrival on campus they assigned armed guards to protect me from the safe-spacers. At this moment, the fainting couchers and safe spacers are everywhere on college campuses, and they are getting their way. University and college officials, afraid of running afoul of title IX, are quietly amending the U.S. Constitution. The First Amendment is being replaced by a woman’s right not to be made uncomfortable. Due process is being treated as a barrier to justice rather than its essence. Armies of gender apparatchiks are monitoring and policing speech, ideas, humor, and sexuality. Since the time of Socrates, education has been synonymous with debate, inquiry, and challenge. If universities replace the ideals of free inquiry and critical thinking with “safety,” they will have lost their reason for being. All of this psychodrama is massively embarrassing to women and to feminism. Some say these new crusaders are a feisty generation that we should admire for refusing to put up with gender injustice. Well, I don’t see the safe spacers as admirable. And I don’t believe they are taking us into some bright new future where women are secure and respected. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Why would you call yourself a feminist? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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The Factual Feminist responds to your questions in this mailbag episode. First up, the most frequently asked question from viewers: Why do you still call yourself a feminist? Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Why would you call yourself a feminist? Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Free speech on campus: Is it in danger? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Campus protestors have shut down recent speeches by Charles Murray, James Watson, Ben Shapiro – and even the Factual Feminist herself. While some observers claim that free speech on campus is in crisis, others argue that college students are more likely support free speech than any other group. Who's right? AEI's Christina Hoff Sommers looks at the data to see if free speech on campus is really in danger. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Sources Washington Post article https://goo.gl/b8zFRb Vox article https://goo.gl/8r2Qai General Social Survey http://gss.norc.org/ Gallup/Knight Foundation Study https://goo.gl/Pg9XWM Reflections on the revolution in Middlebury https://goo.gl/CAYvLv The Oberlin Review https://goo.gl/xq9kau NGL Letter https://goo.gl/zumukk Photo credits BY – Fibonacci Blue https://goo.gl/vApJwU BY – Tedder https://goo.gl/yeD7AP Andy C. Ngo – Lewis & Clark Law School video https://goo.gl/ueKp4i Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #factualfeminist #feminism #freespeech #feminist
The Hunting Ground: Journalism or sensationalism? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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A major new film claims that American college campuses are “hunting grounds” where cunning serial rapists prey upon vulnerable female students. Does it offer an actual picture of college life? AEI Senior Research Associate, Caroline Kitchens, takes a look at the facts. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #films #movies #movie #college #campus © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: The Hunting Ground has been praised by critics, screened at the White House for staff and legislators, and nominated by the Producers’ Guild of America for “best documentary film.” But here’s the problem: the Hunting Ground is not a “documentary”—it is an agenda-driven propaganda film, created by activists. Critics have pointed to so many faults, it’s impossible to cover them all. But here is a brief overview. First, the film uses flawed statistics. It repeats over and over the massively discredited claim that 20% of female students will be sexually assaulted during their time at college. This estimate is based on non-representative surveys of college students that use vaguely worded questions. According to the Bureau of Justice statistics, the correct number is not one in 5, but more like 1 in 53. That is still far too many, but apparently not enough to sustain the Hunting Ground thesis. And here’s another fact the filmmakers left out: women who are not enrolled in college are far more likely to be victims of sexual assault than college women. We also learn from the film that less than eight percent of college men commit more than 90% of the sexual assaults. This comes from David Lisak’s research on repeat offenders, which had long been accepted uncritically in anti-rape circles. But recently, Lisak’s serial predator theory has been questioned by both academic researchers and investigative journalists. His study that originated this claim surveyed men who may not have even been college students, and the researchers didn’t ask about crimes committed on campus. The theory has never been corroborated or replicated by other studies. Yet Lisak’s research is presented as settled science in the Hunting Ground, and Lisak himself takes center stage, warning America about the scourge of hardened, serial predators lurking at frat parties across the country. But the film’s most egregious fault is not its careless use of social science research, but its reckless disregard for the truth when it comes to accusations of rape. The film showcases several disturbing testimonials from alleged victims of sexual assault. But many of the testimonials central to the film have collapsed under scrutiny. The filmmakers appear to have done no fact-checking. For an in-depth look at the glaring omissions and inaccuracies in the Hunting Ground’s portrayal of specific sexual assault claims, see Emily Yoffe’s detailed investigation of the accusations against Harvard Law School student Brandon Winston in Slate and Stuart Taylor’s take on Florida State’s Jameis Winston in National Review Online. The film’s portrayal of the Harvard Law School was case is so unfair and misleading that 19 Harvard Law professors wrote and signed a statement publicly denouncing the film and defending the accused student, Brandon Winston who, in their words, “was subjected to a long, harmful ordeal for no good reason.” Winston’s case had been extensively investigated and he had ultimately been deemed not responsible by the Harvard Law School Faculty, the grand jury who refused to indict him on the serious sexual charges against him, and a jury trial (who only found him guilty of a lesser charge of a “nonsexual nature”). According to the Harvard Law professors, “This purported documentary provides a seriously false picture both of the general sexual assault phenomenon at universities and of our student.” How did the filmmakers respond to the Harvard Law School professors’ critique? By accusing them of “victim blaming” and implying that their letter could be a Title IX violation—it creates a “hostile environment” for victims. #aei #news #politics #government #education
Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia on the "male gaze" | VIEWPOINT
 
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Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia explore the origins of the feminist theory of the "male gaze" and discuss the differences between objectification and admiration. This is part six of a nine part series featuring Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia. The other videos in the series can be found here: Part 1 – The state of contemporary feminism: https://goo.gl/nRJ0ss Part 2 – The fight for student liberties: https://goo.gl/dS1QKF Part 3 – Intersectional feminism and safe spaces: https://goo.gl/cmbj8g Part 4 – Based Mom and Based Goddess on #Gamergate: https://goo.gl/ZFfuzh Part 5 – Trigger warnings and the danger of overprotecting students: https://goo.gl/WE29Yc Part 6 – The “male gaze”: https://goo.gl/hRWfhi Part 7 – Fixing a broken university curriculum: https://goo.gl/pWmpwh Part 8 – The absence of biology in gender studies: https://goo.gl/QrZQEU Part 9 – The danger of looking at history through a contemporary political lens: https://goo.gl/D82LYB Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #politics #news #films #art #movie #movies #interview
Are gender specific toys a hazard to children? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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In 2015, Target stopped labeling aisles for boys and girls to make toys "gender neutral." Does their strategy match the facts? AEI Resident Scholar and Factual Feminist Christina Hoff Sommers argues that while activists want every toy to be marketed to both girls and boys, children are not gender neutral—and she has the data to prove it. Watch other videos with the Factual Feminist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zolPHC562WA&list=PLytTJqkSQqtr7BqC1Jf4nv3g2yDfu7Xmd Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Photo credits: Reuters Lego Twitter http://jessweiner.me/ www.npd.com Time Cezary p The Wall Street Journal Change.org Boys and Girls: Superheroes in the Doll Corner / University Of Chicago Press / Vivian Gussin Paley Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #aei #feminism #feminist #politics #news #genderequality #gendernorms #toys
#YesAllWomen: Facts the media didn't tell you | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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#YesAllWomen received a tremendous amount of attention in the wake of the Isla Vista killings, but the facts did not. The Factual Feminist looks at the numbers behind the hashtag, and reveals some surprising data that shows you may have been misled. New videos every Monday! For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Please SHARE and like! Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
School has become too hostile to boys
 
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More here: http://ow.ly/o4BwT AEI resident scholar Christina Hoff Sommers explores the growing gender gap in education and its implications for future generations. Attributions: Institute of Play Stan Gunn Subscribe AEI's YouTube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/aei For More Information http://www.aei.org School has become too hostile to boys Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education
The real oppression that campus feminists aren't talking about | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Atena Farghadani is a 28 year old Iranian artist. She was just sentenced to 12 years in prison for the crime of posting a feminist cartoon on Facebook. Farghadani is a genuine victim of a repressive patriarchal society—yet you will hear little or nothing about her from the American women’s movement. Why not? AEI scholar Christina Hoff Sommers may have the answer. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMw39... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial Transcript: Atena Farghadani was arrested in August 2014. Twelve members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard came to her house, blindfolded her and took her to prison. What exactly was her crime? She posted a satirical cartoon on Facebook to protest actions of the Iranian parliament. The parliament had proposed to restrict access to birth control. She has been charged with ‘spreading propaganda and “‘insulting members of parliament through paintings.’ Once in prison, she continued to paint and draw. She flattened paper cups and made drawings. This was against prison rules. She was then denied paper cups. When she took some cups from the bathroom into her cell, she was beaten and sexually assaulted. Now she is facing the possibility of years in prison. Atena Farghadani is one of millions of women and men whose basic rights have been ruthlessly violated. I have been to international women’s conferences and met women’s rights activist from countries like Iran, Yemen, Egypt, and Cambodia. They are struggling for freedoms that most women in the west take for granted. They are organizing against barbaric practices such as child marriage, forced veiling, honor killings and acid burnings. Many of them are asking for moral, intellectual and material support from American women’s groups. But American feminists are relatively silent about these injustices—especially feminists on campus. During the 1980s, there were massive demonstrations on American campuses against racial apartheid in South Africa. There is no remotely comparable movement on today’s campuses against the gender apartheid prevalent in large parts of the world. I think I know why. Too many young feminists are too preoccupied with their own supposed victimhood to make common cause with women like Atena Farghadani. If you look at texts used in gender studies classes, visit feminist blogs or websites—you find alarm and outrage over the allegedly oppressed status of American women. The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World, is typical of what one finds in gender studies 101. It ranks the United States along with Uganda and Somalia in terms of women being “kept in their place.” Why? Because apparently in both countries “patriarchal assumptions" operate in "potent combination with fundamentalist religious interpretations." As the editor explains, in parts of Uganda a man can claim an unmarried woman as his wife by raping her. As for the United States, she notes that our state legislators have passed hundreds of anti-abortion measures. But wait a minute-- the Ugandan practice is barbaric. The controversy over abortion in the United States is a sign of a messy democracy working out its disagreements. This past year I visited Yale, UCLA, University of California at San Luis Obispo, as well as Oberlin and Georgetown. I found activist feminist students passionately absorbed in the cause of liberating themselves from the grasp of the oppressive and violent patriarchal rape culture. Their trigger warnings and safe spaces and micro-aggression watches are all about saving themselves from the ravages of the male hegemony. It’s not that they don’t feel bad for women in places like—they feel that they share a similar fate. Except they don’t. They are free women. They are the beneficiaries of two major waves of feminism. Their rights are fully protected by law. Samantha Powers is the able U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and she is a prominent champion of human rights. Well, she recently addressed the graduating class of Barnard College. Instead of urging the graduates to support women struggling against oppression in places like Afghanistan, she congratulated them for waging a similar struggle on the American college campus. #aei
Feminist biology: Do we need feminist sciences? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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The new feminist biology program at the University of Wisconsin was established so that scientific ideas of female origin aren't ignored. But will this program, in the Women's Studies department, contribute to scientific knowledge? The Factual Feminist examines the intersection of feminism and the study of the sciences. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Feminist biology: Do we need feminist sciences? #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Sexual assault in America: Do we know the true numbers? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Sexual assault is a terrible problem that America must solve. The CDC claims that 1-in-5 women in the US will be a victim of rape in their lifetime, a substantially different figure than Department of Justice crime statistics. Christina Sommers says that the CDC's exaggerated numbers get in the way of genuine solutions to the problem, and calls for accurate data and real solutions to help end the scourge of sexual violence. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Sexual assault in America: Do we know the true numbers? Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Is America an imperialist, white-supremacist, capitalist patriarchy? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Gender scholars like bell hooks argue that American is an imperialist, white-supremacist, capitalist patriarchy. Is she right? The Factual Feminist responds. Christina Hoff Sommers is a Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: BY - The U.S. Army https://goo.gl/j5Sf5a Reuters BY - Tim Pierce https://goo.gl/fyhw5X BY - Vyacheslav Argenberg https://goo.gl/17ZMxV BY - EuroVizion https://goo.gl/trLgvH BY - woodleywonderworks https://goo.gl/AHZVuR Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Music credit: "Is That You or Are You You?" by Chris Zabriskie http://chriszabriskie.com/reappear/ Music is used under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #unitedstates #usa #hillaryclinton #hillary #electoralcollege
The Gender Gap: What the World Economic Forum got wrong | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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"Rwanda is beating the U.S. In Gender Equality" That is a headline from a recent news story in the Washington Post. Well, could it be true? Let's check the facts. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #feminism #feminist #politics #news #economy #economics #genderequality #equality © American Enterprise Institute Transcript: The Global Gender Gap Report is a yearly study sponsored by The World Economic Forum. This is a prestigious group that meets in Davos Switzerland each year. It attracts more than 2500 of the world's leading figures in business and politics—people like Bill Gates and German Chancellor Angela Merkel show up. So do celebrities: Bono, Mick Jagger, and Angelina Jolie. The purpose of the gathering is admirable: to brainstorm on ways to make the world a better place. One way the Forum hopes to improve the world is to highlight “role models” of gender equity around the world. Since 2006, the Forum has produced yearly reports ranking the world’s nations on gender—equality in key areas such as Economic opportunity, political empowerment, health and education. The just-released 2015 findings are typical of earlier reports. Rwanda, the Philippines and Nicaragua somehow get higher equity rankings than the US, Australia, Canada and Denmark. Journalists, with few exceptions, have been electrified by the Gender Gap Study. Many have praised it for showing just how backward we are in the United States. The Factual Feminist has concerns about the soundness of the gender gap study. The researchers are well-intentioned, but their study shows a lack of common sense. This is strictly a study of gaps between the sexes. If men and women in nation X are equally illiterate, disenfranchised, and just as likely to die at an early age—that all but guarantees a high ranking. No gender gap—no problem. But that isn't always true. Gaps favoring women are just fine. If women turn out to be better educated, more likely to vote, less vulnerable to violence or early death—those gaps can actually help a county in the rankings. Look at Russia. According to the Davos study, Russian women enjoy 11 more healthy years of life than men. That is bad news for Russian men—but great for Russia's standing in the studies “Healthy Life Expectancy” A Davos report that honestly showed the burdens and benefits of women and men around the world would be far more useful than this quirky, one-sided study. This 2004 chart from the World Health Organization shows men throughout the world at vastly higher risk for injury and violence. Gender gaps are complicated—but the World Economic Forum disguises that. It’s giving an over-simplified and distorted picture of what's really going on. There are other troubling features: the study does not distinguish between free societies and dictatorships, and it greatly rewards countries that use gender quotas in allocating political positions. Countries that combine dictatorships and gender quotas (Cuba, Rwanda, Burundi) are almost guaranteed “role model” status in the category of political empowerment. Again, that is misleading. Rwanda’s 2003 constitution establishes gender quotas for the lower parliament. Women now occupy 64% of the seats. But that same constitution gives the current president close to absolute power—including the right to dissolve the parliament. The human rights watchdog group, Freedom House, gives Rwanda’s failing grades where political rights are concerned. In Mozambique and Burundi, almost everyone (male and female) is in the full-time labor force. That improves their Davos ranking, but is it a sign of progress and opportunity—or even true equality? These countries are not bastions of gender equality—what they are is desperately poor and nearly everyone is forced to work—men women and often children too. In wealthy countries like the U.S. and Germany lot of mothers choose to work part time, or even leave the workforce when they have children. But that creates gaps that get penalized by the Davos metrics. The Gender Gap: What the World Economic Forum got wrong #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
The war on gamers continues | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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A major humanitarian group has just come out with a lesson plan for high school students on sexism in video games. It is full of propaganda, vilifies gaming and gamers, and is likely to discourage young women from playing. Does this matter, or is it all just a game? AEI resident scholar Christina Hoff Sommers explains. Watch more of the Factual Feminist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMw39... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #politics #news #feminism #feminist #games #gaming #gamer #videogames #gamergirl © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: “Is Gaming A Boy’s Club?” is the name of a school lesson plan developed by the Anti-Defamation League—ADL for short. The ADL is a well-respected organization that has fought anti-Semitism and racism for decades. As a long-time admirer of the ADL, I am baffled by its sponsorship of such a biased and dogmatic curriculum. The lesson plan advertises itself as meeting standards for inclusion in the Common Core—an influential national curriculum. The entire lesson plan is dedicated to the proposition that video games are a hotbed of sexism and misogyny, and it gives students the message that anyone who dares to suggest that games should be more inclusive can expect to be terrorized by malevolent gamers. Lesson materials include a video and an article by feminist critic Anita Sarkeesian—both are harsh indictments of the world of gaming. That would be fine if she were not the only assigned author. In another part of the lesson plan, the teacher places seven posters around the room—each bearing a statement about video games. Students are then told to attach Post-Its to those they agree with. Three are neutral—for example: “I have played video games” and “I have watched other people play video games.” But four are affirmations about sexism: “I have witnessed sexism in video games,” “I believe video games can perpetuate sexism.” None says anything positive about games—such as, “Gaming is an exciting activity for both women and men,” or “Sexism in video games is exaggerated.”The curriculum also includes a small group discussion on sexism and video games and “additional resources” that focus on—guess what?-- harassment, misogyny, and terror in the culture of video games. The curriculum is not only obsessively one-sided—much it is false, misleading, or exaggerated. Let’s start with the very first sentence. “Video games do not have a good track record when it comes to positively including girls and women.” But on page 3 of the curriculum students learn that women now constitute 48 percent of video game players—up from 40 percent in 2010. An important study has shown that there has been a major demographic shift in the video game industry toward the inclusion of women, but men and women prefer to play different types of games. The world of games is rich and diverse and there is room for everyone. Why give young women the discouraging message that they are not wanted? What about the idea that video games—especially those most popular with men-- perpetuate sexism? The lesson plan promotes this idea, yet offers no evidence. The fact is, as video games have thrived in the U.S., so have women’s freedoms and opportunities and participation in sports and games. As I have said in an earlier videos on gaming, gender critics have to show, not dogmatically assume, that video games make men sexist and unjust—or hold women back in some way. They have not even tried to meet burden of proof. Finally, what about the claim that when women criticize video games, they receive abusive messages or even threats. Unfortunately, this is sometimes true. Feminist critics have received threats, and that’s deplorable. But what the ADL fails to mention is that no one knows who sent them—and males (and females) who challenge the feminist critique receive them too. Milo Yianappoulos, a British writer who defends gamers from the charge of sexism received a letter that contained dead mouse impaled by a razor blade. The war on gamers continues #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Verizon's Inspire Her Mind ad and the facts they didn't tell you | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Do girls fall behind in science and engineering because our society tells them they should be pretty, rather than, "pretty brilliant." That's the message of a new viral Verizon campaign. But the Factual Feminist shows that many inconvenient facts were held back to construct the the misleading narrative. Watch the Factual Feminist series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Verizon's Inspire Her Mind ad and the facts they didn't tell you Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Where does "rule of thumb" come from? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Feminist analysis of the term, "rule of thumb" usually refers to an alleged law where a man could beat his wife with a stick no wider than his thumb. But is that true? And if not, how did the term originate? The Factual Feminist answers these questions and more. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLytTJqkSQqtr7BqC1Jf4nv3g2yDfu7Xmd Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Where does "rule of thumb" come from? Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
True Happiness: Earned Success
 
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Video submitted by Brandon Carter for AEI's 2012 video contest "Make the Moral Case for Free Enterprise." Please visit our gallery of featured videos: http://www.aei.org/videocontest. Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education
United States and India: Two of the world's worst countries for women? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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In June 2018, the Thomson Reuters Foundation published the results of a poll identifying "the world's most dangerous countries for women." Despite several organizations offering plenty of statistics to the contrary, India was declared the most dangerous country for women, while the United States placed tenth. AEI's Christina Hoff Sommers breaks down the hard numbers to identify if this poll is based on fact or opinion. PODCAST – The Femsplainers https://goo.gl/13yHJe Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Sources Thomson Reuters - The World's Most Dangerous Countries for Women https://goo.gl/2tmx8D USA Today article https://goo.gl/eygbs9 CBS News article https://goo.gl/stKjPX Newsweek article https://goo.gl/ad99kF CNN article https://goo.gl/dR1BDJ Fortune article https://goo.gl/ksnRks NPR article https://goo.gl/ZbVSwT Trafficking in Persons Report - June 2017 https://goo.gl/4fPKmS World Health Organization report https://goo.gl/ZvecdA NDTV interview https://goo.gl/iKnmXf Photo credits Reuters BY - WomanSTATS/[email protected] https://goo.gl/79BonC https://goo.gl/zWYgy9 Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #factualfeminist #feminism #feminist #usa #india #america #poll
Sexual assault myths: Part 2 | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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The United States is not a rape culture, but it is a gender propaganda culture. We are overwhelmed by false information about men and women, and nowhere is this more true than in the area of sexual violence. A new Bureau of Justice Statistics study has the latest numbers, and the Factual Feminist does some fact checking. Watch more of the Factual Feminist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: As I said last week, the United States does is not a rape culture, but it is a gender propaganda culture. We are overwhelmed by false information about men and women, and nowhere is this more true than in the area of sexual violence. So let’s do some fact checking. That’s next on the Factual Feminist. We often hear that “female students are at greater risk of rape than their non-college peers." But this is just not true. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, females enrolled in college experience lower rates of rape and sexual assault than their non-college piers. Senator Gillibrand, and others who repeat this canard, they have to stop. “If you are a young woman who attends college today, you are more likely to be sexually assaulted than those who don’t.” Now where does the claim come from? The original source appears to be a 2000 study by Bonnie Fischer and her associates. Well a reporter at the Chronicle of Higher Education recently contacted Fisher to ask what data she used to justify her claim that female college students are most at risk. Well according to the reporter, Fisher could not answer. She was confused. Later, she responded: "That was probably the current state of knowledge or belief at that time, given the research available.” But the data were no different in 2000, and they were available. In a recent New York Times op-ed, University of Colorado Denver researcher Callie Marie Rennison pointed out that our fixation on relatively privileged college women has distracted us from the far greater vulnerability of poor and less educated women.  Rennison found, for example, that “Women without a high school diploma are sexually victimized at a rate 53 percent greater than women with a high school diploma or some college.” Poor women are at greater risk but they have been lost in the current panic over sexual assault at places like Yale, or Swarthmore, or the University of Wisconsin. Let’s consider another damaging myth. Almost every college employee who receives training about campus rapes will learn that campus rapes are committed by 6 percent of males on campus. And these men tend to be ruthless and incorrigible repeat offenders. This is known as the predator theory of college assault and it’s is taken very seriously by university officials, and they use it to justify cutting back on due process and expelling anyone implicated in a campus date rape. Now this is understandable: deans and college presidents don’t want to keep sociopaths around. Now the theory was developed by a researcher, David Lisak, retired from the University of Massachusetts Boston. In 2002 he and a colleague published a study on campus sex offenders, and for the study they analyzed questionnaires distributed to male passersby in a busy pedestrian area at UMass-Boston. According to Lisak, of the nearly nineteen hundred men who returned the survey, one hundred and twenty respondents - about 1 in 16 - admitted to committing acts that met the legal definition of rape or attempted rape. And more than half of this group admitted to raping more than once and they also confessed to a range of other heinous violent crimes. Well in her excellent critique of Lisak’s study, Slate’s Emily Yoffe points out that the participants were hardly typical. I mean most college students are age 18-24. Lisak’s subjects were 18-71. Now UMass Boston is an urban commuter school with no campus housing and a four-year graduation rate of 15 percent. I taught there in the early 1980s. Things may be different today, but at that time most of my students were adults with full-time jobs and more than a few had been in jail. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Why did Hillary Clinton lose the election? | IN 60 SECONDS
 
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With everything from third-party voters to the electoral college being blamed for Hillary's loss in the 2016 election, AEI Resident Fellow Michael Barone explores the real reasons behind Trump's victory over Clinton. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Reuters BY - Max Stanworth https://goo.gl/Af2ba9 Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Maps of Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin provided by https://freevectormaps.com/ Music credit: BY - "Found Smoke" by Pitx http://ccmixter.org/files/Pitx/48064 Music marked "BY" is used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #hillary #imwithher #trump #trump2016 #election #election2016
Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia: The full interview | VIEWPOINT
 
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What would happen if Based Mom sat down with Based Goddess for an hour to discuss modern-day feminism? No need to speculate—here's the full one-hour interview (with bonus content!) featuring Christina Hoff Sommers and Camille Paglia where they break down #Gamergate, intersectional feminism, the "male gaze", and much, much more. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #politics #news #college #university #philosophy #art #interview
Are men inferior to women? Let's check the data | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Are women good, and men bad? How many times have you heard that women are wiser, kinder, more efficient, and just all around superior human beings? A never ending succession of books and news stories suggests they are. AEI scholar Christina Hoff Sommers looks at the evidence. Watch more of the Factual Feminist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMw39... Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #politics #news #feminism #feminist #men #women #girlpower © American Enterprise Institute Partial transcript: It used to be fashionable to celebrate men’s alleged superiority over women—Aristotle referred to women as defective men. Philosophers like Immanuel Kant and Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Friedrich Nietzsche deemed women intellectually inferior to men. Fortunately, those male chauvinistic days are mostly gone. But today a new kind of reverse, female chauvinism prevails. It is so common, social scientists have given it a name: the WOMEN are WONDERFUL phenomenon—WAW for short. Here is a sample of recent WAW headlines. Let’s consider some common claims of female superiority: Multi-tasking: It is a truth universally recognized that women are better at multi-tasking; Here is the British writer Sir Ken Robinson in one of the most watched TED talks of all time: “I think this is probably why women are better at multitasking. Because you are, aren’t you? There’s a raft of research, but I know it from my personal life.” Sir Robinson refers to a “raft of research” Well, where is it? What we have is a handful of small, inconclusive, inconsistent studies. Some show women are better—while others find that it’s men who excel. Thomas Buser a researcher at University of Amsterdam, took a careful look at the data and concluded that, “As far as gender differences are concerned, we do not find any evidence for them in the effects of multitasking.” It turns out that neither sex is particularly good at focusing on more than one thing at once. Niceness: What about the claim that women are just a lot nicer than men? According to film critic Roger Ebert: “Women are nicer than men… in terms of their lifelong natures, women are kinder, more empathetic, more generous. And the sooner more of them take positions of power, the better our chances as a species.” Is he right? Well, when it comes to generosity, kindness, and altruism, once again you find lots of dueling studies. But one of the most thorough and careful surveys was carried out by Tom Smith and his team at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Unlike many other studies of altruism, this one was not limited to a small, unrepresentative sample of college students. Also, Smith and his team asked questions that included both male and female styles of altruism. Women tend to adopt nurturing and caring roles toward people they know—while men excel at good deeds and acts of kindness involving strangers. In Smith’s survey, women proved to be more empathetic than men: they were more likely to feel pity for others and to describe themselves as soft­hearted. But when it came to the empirically critical measure of generosity—how much do you actually do for others—the results were different. When Smith and his colleagues tallied up the results, they found that the score was even. “Gender,” Smith concluded, “is not notably related to altruistic behaviors.” Advantage: Neither sex. Both sexes have their graces and their own styles of being virtuous. Neither has a monopoly on good or evil. How did we lose sight of this obvious truth? Because we're in the age of WAW. The rules of the Women are Wonderful game make it impossible for men to win: If women do something better than men, that is evidence of their superiority. If men outperform women, that's proof of discrimination—retrograde patriarchy and toxic masculinity. To violate the spirit of WAW is to invite havoc. Suggest, as the former president of Harvard Larry Summers did, that men may have some innate advantages in math and spatial reasoning, and prepare to change your job. Write a book or article titled “Are Men Necessary?,” "The End of Men," Man Down, or Women are From Venus, Men are from Hell," and the gods of the zeitgeist smile. #aei #news #politics #government
Is academic philosophy a "safe space" for women? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
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Some claim that philosophy departments are a hostile place for women. The Factual Feminist, a former philosophy professor, checks the facts! Watch other videos from the Factual Feminist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYpELqKZ02Q&list=PLytTJqkSQqtr7BqC1Jf4nv3g2yDfu7Xmd Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist #politics #news #college #safespace #university